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This week’s early childhood headlines: April 3, 2020

Categories: Blog

In the spirit of educating and advocating for our children, The Children’s Movement of Florida presents Worth Reading Weekly. Delivered every Friday, this newsletter gathers the top Florida headlines about early childhood education, parenting, and healthcare so it’s easy for you to stay informed.

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“Normal” Screen Time Rules for Kids No Longer Apply — Now What?

From Romper: “Instead of worrying about ‘screen time,’ we need to think about HOW our families are using technology to meet our human needs and values right now.”

Why Women Shouldn’t Be Forced to Give Birth Alone — Even in a Pandemic

From POPSUGAR: “If hospitals dismiss the need for a support person in the name of public health, Akileswaran fears we will be trading one theoretical short-term gain for a longer-term loss – namely, increased birth-related interventions and unnecessary cesarean births.”

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Working From Home? Here Are Tips For Parents Juggling Jobs and Kids

From Orlando Business Journal: “As the threat of COVID-19 impacts our state, it’s important we do all we can to lessen the financial burden this public health emergency has on Florida families.”

Parenting During Coronavirus: You Are Enough

From PBS Kids for Parents: “The moments you carve out during the day to connect and cuddle are just what they need right now. The everyday stories, songs and routines you share are exactly the right stuff to help them feel safe, secure and loved.”

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Florida Healthy Kids Takes Proactive Steps During COVID-19 Outbreak

From Lake Okeechobee News: “As the threat of COVID-19 impacts our state, it’s important we do all we can to lessen the financial burden this public health emergency has on Florida families.”

 

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The Children’s Trust Ensures Salaries During Pandemic

From The Miami Times: “The Children’s Trust is doing its part to make sure that the early learning educators whose job it is to care for the children of first-responders and essential workers continue to receive the salary supplements they depend on despite the current coronavirus pandemic.”

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Parents of Kids with Disabilities Worry Coronavirus Quarantine Will Mean Regression

From The Hechinger Report: “Roughly 7 million children — 14 percent of all public-school students — receive federally mandated special education services on account of their disabilities.”